Alberta budget 2021: Alberta universities eyeing tuition hikes, campus changes as funding model evolves – Calgary

Alberta budget 2021: Alberta universities eyeing tuition hikes, campus changes as funding model evolves - Calgary
The University of Calgary says a third consecutive year of funding cuts from the provincial government will have impacts on campus and community programs.In the budget tabled Thursday, the Alberta UCP said in the 2020-2021 year, own-source revenue for post-secondary institutions is expected to cover 47 per cent of schools’ operating costs.By 2023-2024, the government wants that to reach 52 per cent. Read more: Alberta budget 2021 promises more help for COVID-19 with $18B deficit The U of C said the budget cut the university’s operating budget by $25 million, meaning since 2019, the university’s total budget has been cut by 18 per cent.The school said the reductions bring the operating budget to less than it was in 2011, when, according to the university, it had 4,300 fewer students on its campus. Story...

Sunwing taps into federal loan program for $375M amid new travel rules – National

Sunwing taps into federal loan program for $375M amid new travel rules - National
Sunwing is turning to an emergency federal loan program aimed at helping Canada’s largest businesses weather the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic after new travel restrictions were announced last week. Read more: Airlines suspend flights to sun destinations until April 30 amid growing variant concerns The loan agreement, announced Monday, will see Sunwing Airlines Inc. and Sunwing Vacations Inc. access $375 million under the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF) – the first Canadian airline to do so.There has been little uptake for the LEEFF since it was first announced in May, with only two other companies – Gateway Casinos & Entertainment Ltd. and Canumo Resources Ltd. – having been approved for loans under the program.To qualify for the LEEFF, a company must require a loan of at least $60...

RESP customers complain about delays accessing money

RESP customers complain about delays accessing money
Some customers of a Richmond Hill, Ont.-based education savings plan company say they’re having a tough time getting at their money.“What if it’s not there and that’s why they’re stalling, that’s what I’m worrying about,” said Sebastian Kidston in an interview after contacting Global News for help. He and his mother persistently tried to reach Global RESP Corp. and its related fund manager, Global Growth Assets Inc. (GGAI), founded and owned by Sam Bouji, also known as Issam El-Bouji. For months, some customers have complained online that staff at the Global group have not returned phone calls or been responsive to their requests for help. In March, the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) reached a settlement with Global and Bouji after the regulator alleged “repeat misconduct” by Global and Bouji for a series of...

Province addresses ‘unfair’ bidding process for government projects – Saskatoon

Province addresses ‘unfair’ bidding process for government projects - Saskatoon
Watch the video above: Cabinet shuffle puts spotlight on province’s procurement policiesSASKATOON – A group of Saskatchewan business owners have said other provinces are giving their companies competitive advantages when it comes to bidding on local government projects.Premier Brad Wall has tasked Saskatchewan’s Minister of Justice Gordon Wyant with establishing a new branch of SaskBuilds, Priority Saskatchewan, which aims to create a fairer bidding process.Saskatchewan’s largest steel fabrication company, Supreme Steel, has had to lay off 75 employees this spring.“There’s a lot of social impact of layoffs, it affects families,” said Ross Fraser, Supreme’s senior vice president.Fraser said there will always be an ebb and flow of layoffs in the construction industry, but he said there’s another important factor: companies like his...

Savaria Corp. Q2 income plummets 89 per cent to $140,000

Savaria Corp. Q2 income plummets 89 per cent to $140,000
LAVAL, Que. – Elevator and accessibility company Savaria Corp. (TSX:SIS) says its second quarter income was down 89 per cent from a year ago as it lost money on foreign exchange, dealt with poor weather, and saw an increase in financing costs.Savaria also spent more money on operating expenses for newly acquired companies.The company, based in the Montreal area, said net income was $140,000, compared to $1.3 million in the same quarter last year. Revenues were almost flat at $16 million, versus $16.9 million.The company said it took a foreign exchange loss because the value of the loonie was six per cent higher over the same period in 2010. The company sells 50 per cent of its goods outside Canada, primarily in the United States. Trending Stories Global coronavirus cases surpass 20...