Halifax wheelchair user ‘trapped’ in apartment due to 15-day-long elevator repair

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A Halifax mom is advocating for her son with disabilities, who hasn’t been able to leave his apartment for more than two weeks, due to an out-of-order elevator.Tracy Denney and her 30-year-old son Adam live on the third floor at 16 Caxton Close, with four flights of stairs standing between their apartment and the exit.“I’m fed up,” Denney tells Global News.Adam has spina bifida and has been wheelchair-bound since he was two years old.The only elevator in their building broke down Feb 24. For more than two weeks, Adam has not been able to leave his apartment. Read more: Waiting list ‘abyss’ in N.S. for care and housing of people with disabilities: doctor Story continues below advertisement Now, his mother says it’s having an impact on his physical and mental health.“I...

Fewer veterans have applied for disability during COVID-19, sparking accessibility concerns – National

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By Staff The Canadian Press Posted October 25, 2020 2:08 pm Smaller font Descrease article font size -A Larger font Increase article font size A+ The federal government is being criticized for not doing enough to help disabled veterans as new figures appear to confirm fears COVID-19 is making it more difficult for them to apply for assistance.The figures from Veterans Affairs Canada show about 8,000 veterans applied for disability benefits during the first three full months of the pandemic, which was about half the normal number. Read more: Career caravan offers Canadian military...

People with disabilities, autism carry a heavier pandemic burden, advocates say – National

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People with intellectual disabilities and autism are dying of COVID-19 at higher rates than other people in at least two states in the U.S., according to new data collected by NPR.In Pennsylvania, people with intellectual disabilities and autism are dying at a rate twice as high as other people who contract the virus. In New York, they’re dying at 2.5 times the rate of others.One in four Canadians — about 25 per cent of the population — has a disability, according to the latest data from Statistics Canada, and experts worry the numbers are similar when it comes to COVID-19 deaths in Canada.READ MORE: Disability advocates say B.C. woman’s death shows need for clearer COVID-19 policy“We know that … when you look at the response (to COVID-19) and the (exclusion) of certain populations … people with disabilities is one of those...

Coronavirus: Federal panel aims to ensure Canadians with disabilities included in response

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The COVID-19 pandemic takes a particularly heavy toll on Canadians with disabilities and more efforts are needed to ensure they’re included in national efforts to respond to the crisis, the minister overseeing accessibility issues said Friday as she appointed an advisory group to take on the task.Disability Inclusion Minister Carla Qualtrough said disabled residents have been sounding alarms about a host of concerns related to the outbreak, which has already killed at least 550 Canadians and sickened a minimum of 22,000 others. In a statement announcing the advisory group, Qualtrough said greater efforts are needed to ensure disabled voices are heard during a troubling time. READ MORE: Live updates on coronavirus in Canada “For some persons with disabilities, underlying medical conditions put them at greater risk of serious...

Remapping accessibility around the world

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[ad_1] Maayan Ziv was born with muscular dystrophy and has used a wheelchair since she was a child. She’s had to come up with creative solutions to get around on the busy streets of Toronto. That led to developing an app that’s remapping accessibility around the world. Robin Gill reports. [ad_2] Source...

Accessibility tour: could you navigate Calgary streets blind? – Calgary

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CALGARY – Councillor Druh Farrell got to experience Calgary in a very different way Thursday morning.She joined ten decision makers from the city’s transportation and planning and development and assessment departments, the Calgary Construction Association and Development and non-for-profit organizations in taking on a disability for a day.The group started at the Municipal Building, trying out doors and washrooms, before heading out on city streets, towards Olympic Plaza.“I have never noticed that! Whoop! Sorry! Curb!” remarked Farrell crossing the street on Stephan Avenue. She spent the first half of the tour blindfolded, with a cane, before moving around, albeit slowly, in a wheelchair.“It’s enlightening. I feel every little impediment… Every little obstacle, every little bump,” said Farrell.READ MORE: Edmonton cracks down on...