Community of Liverpool, N.S., raises thousands for new fully accessible play place – Halifax

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The community of Liverpool, N.S., and surrounding areas have joined forces to raise thousands of dollars for a new universally-designed play park for children and seniors of all ages.The play place will come fully equipped with features that include wheelchair-accessible sandboxes and picnic tables, dual-facing swings, as well as audio and brail components — all in a fenced-in area to make sure everyone stays safe.“It’s not just for a child with autism, it’s not just for a child in a wheelchair, this is for everybody,” said Elise Johnston, accessibility coordinator for the Region of Queen’s Municipality. Read more: Municipalities, riders have wish lists ready for ‘transformative’ federal public transit funds The idea came to life back in 2016 ahead of the area’s municipal election, when Debbie Wamboldt...

Open House: Converting homes to safely age in place

Open House: Converting homes to safely age in place


The aging population spread of COVID-19 in care homes has lead to an increase in renovations on current homes to allow aging in place. One local company has been kept busy converting homes and especially bathrooms to safely allow people to stay in their homes longer.

‘Choked me up’: motorized wheelchair takes hunter into the wild for the first time

Bobbie Cherepuschak tests out the snow blade attachment on his new motorized wheelchair.
It can plow through a foot of fresh snow with ease, climb steep hills and traverse rugged prairie terrain.After time spent advocating for better accessibility for hunters in Saskatchewan, a Lumsden outdoorsman raised the money needed to purchase a specialized, all-terrain wheelchair. Bobbie Cherepuschak tests out the snow blade attachment on his new motorized wheelchair. Supplied This past hunting season he used it to go off the road and into the wild for the first time in his life. Story continues below advertisement “It was the first time I’d ever been off the road, into the bush, and you know, to be totally honest, it chokes me up whenever I think about it,” said Bobbie Cherepuschakm, who has been embracing the outdoors his...

Municipalities, riders have wish lists ready for ‘transformative’ federal public transit funds – Halifax

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Nova Scotia municipalities and transit users are welcoming a federal $14.9-billion commitment to public transit projects, and some say, their wish lists are ready to go.The eight-year spending commitment comes after a strained financial year for local governments grappling with the crippling economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic.“I think it’s transformative in terms of public transit in Canada,” said Halifax Mayor Mike Savage in a morning interview with Global News.“We already have a plan for electrification of our fleet as well as moving to bus and ferry rapid transit. These are expensive things.” 6:47 Mayor Mike Savage previews his State of the Municipality...

Nova Scotia first province to adopt Hansen Foundation curriculum in schools

Nova Scotia first province to adopt Hansen Foundation curriculum in schools
By Staff The Canadian Press Posted February 2, 2021 3:32 pm     Updated February 2, 2021 3:33 pm Smaller font Descrease article font size -A Larger font Increase article font size A+ HALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s Education Department is teaming up with the Rick Hansen Foundation to provide inclusion and accessibility teaching materials to the province’s schools.The free online programs are now available to teachers and include access to foundation ambassadors...

Advocates say Peggy’s Cove viewing deck will accommodate accessibility needs

Advocates say Peggy’s Cove viewing deck will accommodate accessibility needs


The recent public announcement of a multimillion-dollar project that would see an accessible viewing deck constructed at Peggy’s Cove, has been met with plenty of different views and opinions. One wheelchair citizen says the project is rooted in improving accessibility. Alexa Maclean has the story.

Accessibility advocates say Peggy’s Cove viewing deck will ensure safe access for all – Halifax

Peggy
The recent public announcement of a multimillion-dollar project that would see an accessible viewing deck constructed at Peggy’s Cove, has been met with plenty of different views and opinions.Following the announcement, Michelle Paul, a Mi’kmaw water protector, raised concern over the possibility of construction damaging areas where Mi’kmaq harvest sweetgrass, one of their sacred medicines.The Crown corporation behind the project, Develop Nova Scotia, says they’ve taken Paul’s concern seriously and have verified that the deck won’t impact sweetgrass areas and they’re also working to ensure no other sweetgrass areas will be impacted. Read more: Mi’kmaq fear new Peggy’s Cove boardwalk could endanger sacred medicine On Saturday, a small group of protesters met outside of Peggy’s Cove, masked and...

Nova Scotia investing $3.1M for construction of viewing deck on Peggy’s Cove shore – Halifax

Design showing how the viewing deck will look like (Develop Nova Scotia)
The province of Nova Scotia announced Friday that it will be investing $3.1 million to support the construction of an accessible viewing deck on the rugged shore of Peggy’s Cove, one of the province’s most popular tourist areas.This new project will help ensure a safe, accessible and engaging experience for visitors, business operators and residents.According to the province, the viewing deck and railings will be made of wood and steel, materials that will last and are complementary to the rugged terrain. Design showing how the viewing deck will look like (Develop Nova Scotia). The rail guard will be a steel knit pattern that resembles fishnet. It will be set into the landscape and take the shape of the rock to avoid overshadowing the real attraction at...

Quadriplegic living in Calgary wins award for making spaces more accessible – Calgary

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It’s been 16 years since a moment in time changed Sean Crump’s life.“I broke my neck in 2004. I went camping with friends and ran into the water and I did a dolphin dive and there was a sandbank and I hit the sandbank.“I was 19, so you’re getting used to the person you are,” Crump said.“You are comfortable in your own skin, you break you neck and you have a whole new skin to get used to.” But the Calgary businessman made his personal journey his life’s work. He wanted to inspire people to shift their own perceptions of people with disabilities.“That was something eye-opening — people who I’d known my life, they had one life plan or perception of me and after I broke my neck, it changed dramatically and I don’t know that it should have,” Crump said. Story continues below...