Halifax-based non-profit goes digital for week-long conference on accessibility and inclusion – Halifax

Halifax-based non-profit goes digital for week-long conference on accessibility and inclusion - Halifax
Celebrations for this year’s National AccessAbility Week (NAAW) are going digital.Due to COVID-19, the team at Halifax-based non-profit, reachAbility, has turned their annual conference into an online festival that includes live workshops, speakers, presentations and more — open to everyone and at no cost.NAAW celebrates and recognizes contributions made by persons with disabilities and those who are actively removing barriers for everyone in Canada.Since COVID-19 put restrictions on public gatherings, staff at reachAbility decided to take NAAW 2020 to a fully accessible online format. Story continues below advertisement The digital conference will feature a speaker series featuring leaders in inclusion and accessibility from the arts to business, government to non-profit.There will also be live discussions from...

Coronavirus: Accessibility advocate calls on Ford government to provide support for special needs students

Coronavirus: Accessibility advocate calls on Ford government to provide support for special needs students
A Toronto-based accessibility advocate is calling on the Ontario government for a comprehensive plan to remove barriers that online learning creates for students with disabilities.“We’ve been calling on the government to show leadership. Whether it’s the crisis in nursing homes or the crisis facing students with disabilities, it’s the recurring failure to lead,” said David Lepofsky of Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) Alliance.On Tuesday, the Ford government announced schools across the province will remain closed for in-person learning due to the coronavirus pandemic.In addition, Education Minister Stephen Lecce, acknowledging that families of students with special needs need more support, announced two new initiatives specific to those students.READ MORE: Online schooling not a smooth transition for parents...

‘I need help’: Coronavirus highlights disparities among Canadians with disabilities – National

‘I need help’: Coronavirus highlights disparities among Canadians with disabilities - National
Prior to the novel coronavirus pandemic, 27-year-old Marissa Blake was rarely ever home.Now, Blake, who lives in Toronto supportive housing and needs assistance to walk, can only have one visitor a week for three hours and can’t see her friends in-person. An appointment to discuss surgery on her legs was cancelled, and her sleep and care schedule are in flux because her personal support workers keep changing.“It’s difficult,” she said. “I feel like I’m in jail.” READ MORE: Disability advocates say B.C.’s woman’s death shows need for clearer COVID-19 policy Her exercise program with March of Dimes Canada, a rehabilitation foundation for disabled persons, was cancelled, and Blake said she’s been less physically active than usual.“It’s been really making me tight, really making me feel like I’m fighting with...