Child-care accessibility in Saskatchewan schools expanding with reopen plan

Child-care accessibility in Saskatchewan schools expanding with reopen plan
People returning to work under the first two phases of the Reopen Saskatchewan plan will have access to licensed child-care services, according to the government.Over 2,100 spaces in 47 school-based centres continue to operate as part of a reserved supply for coronavirus pandemic response workers, according to a press release. READ MORE: ‘New normal’ — Saskatchewan dentists prepare to accept more patients under COVID-19 protocols Government officials said there is capacity within that supply to expand accessibility to other workers starting on May 4.“As we move to gradually reopen Saskatchewan, we know that parents, caregivers and families returning to work will need child care support, and we are helping them by ensuring their children are safe and well cared for,” Education Minister Gordon Wyant said in a press release...

Concerns raised over accessibility of police paraphernalia following Nova Scotia shooting

Concerns raised over accessibility of police paraphernalia following Nova Scotia shooting
It’s not hard to buy an old police vehicle.Across the country, it’s common practice to sell decommissioned, stripped-down police vehicles at auctions, available to anyone with a credit card.“You’re likely to see more at a government auction; there’s a couple auction houses here that sell that,” said David Giles, vice-president of All EV Canada, a company that specializes in electric vehicles. READ MORE: Nova Scotia gunman’s use of unlicensed vehicle helped evade police detection Through his work, Giles regularly monitors auctions across the country for parts, and says he has seen much more than just old vehicles up for sale.“I’ve seen anything from decals, light bars push bars, racks, cages for inside the vehicles,” said Giles. Story continues below advertisement In early March, an...

Halifax non-profit ensuring accessibility, inclusion during COVID-19 – Halifax

reachAbility Co-Founder and CEO, Tova Sherman
Once a week, Global News will feature our local community partners to highlight how they are handling day-to-day operations during the coronavirus pandemic and how you can help.How do you reach out to hundreds of clientele during a pandemic?  If you’re reachAbility, you do it the old fashioned way: by telephone.“The first thing we did, was contact all 500 of our clients and asked them what they needed,” says reachAbility co-founder and CEO Tova Sherman. “We decided the first step was to do a needs assessment of all our clients and what we found was they require information and resources.” READ MORE: Coronavirus: Ontario, Quebec expected to unveil plans for reopening economies this week ReachAbility is a non-profit organization based out of Halifax, N.S., that provides supportive and accessible programs to individuals...

Coronavirus pandemic not slowing tide of inner-city drug use, desperation: Winnipeg Bear Clan – Winnipeg

Colorado theatre shooter’s psychiatrist was warned he thought about killing people - National
The world may have changed around it, but for Winnipeg’s Bear Clan Patrol, it’s business as usual, even during a pandemic.Bear Clan executive director James Favel told 680 CJOB the coronavirus crisis hasn’t changed the landscape of poverty and crime his community group deals with on a daily basis.If anything, it’s made things even more difficult for people who were already struggling. In addition to providing meals and food hampers for people in need six days a week, Bear Clan volunteers have picked up an unprecedented number of used syringes on the streets in 2020. Story continues below advertisement “So far in the first quarter, we picked up over 80,000 needles this year,” said Favel.“Last year, we picked up 145,000 used syringes all year long… so we’re projecting 320,000 if things stay the...

Coronavirus: Federal panel aims to ensure Canadians with disabilities included in response

Coronavirus: Federal panel aims to ensure Canadians with disabilities included in response
The COVID-19 pandemic takes a particularly heavy toll on Canadians with disabilities and more efforts are needed to ensure they’re included in national efforts to respond to the crisis, the minister overseeing accessibility issues said Friday as she appointed an advisory group to take on the task.Disability Inclusion Minister Carla Qualtrough said disabled residents have been sounding alarms about a host of concerns related to the outbreak, which has already killed at least 550 Canadians and sickened a minimum of 22,000 others. In a statement announcing the advisory group, Qualtrough said greater efforts are needed to ensure disabled voices are heard during a troubling time. READ MORE: Live updates on coronavirus in Canada “For some persons with disabilities, underlying medical conditions put them at greater risk of serious...