Accessibility essential for Alberta’s COVID-19 updates: ‘We have no choice but to wait’

Quebec invests $4.2M toward better accessibility at Place des Arts metro - Montreal
On Monday, an ASL/English interpreter was present during an Alberta Health COVID-19 update for the first time.It’s a significant moment for the deaf and hard of hearing community, which had called on the government to provide an interpreter or live captioning during the updates. READ MORE: 74 confirmed coronavirus cases in Alberta; cases detected in all health zones “It’s about accessibility,” said president of the Edmonton Association of the Deaf, Sarah Snively.“Ever since the information was released about the pandemic, hearing individuals were kept informed by listening to what is being shared in real-time through all media outlets, while deaf people were left out.” Tweet This Snively said many members of the community turned to updates out of B.C. or other provinces where an...

Lumsden man hopes rule changes can improve hunting accessibility in Saskatchewan

Bobbie Cherepuschak is hoping to improve hunting accessibility in Saskatchewan.
Bobbie Cherepuschak has been hunting in Saskatchewan for nearly 20 years.An avid outdoorsman, Cherepuschak, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair to get around, has found a way to take his expeditions to the next level.Warning: The photo below may upset some readers. Bobbie Cherepuschak is hoping to improve hunting accessibility in Saskatchewan. Bobbie Cherepuschak/Facebook He recently noticed some American friends posting on social media about hunting with rugged, all-terrain tracked wheelchairs and was immediately struck by the new level of freedom the chairs could grant him. Story continues below advertisement “It would let me go way more places than just shooting from my truck, get up close and personal with the animals that are out there and, see...