Accessibility tour: could you navigate Calgary streets blind? – Calgary

Accessibility tour: could you navigate Calgary streets blind? - Calgary
CALGARY – Councillor Druh Farrell got to experience Calgary in a very different way Thursday morning.She joined ten decision makers from the city’s transportation and planning and development and assessment departments, the Calgary Construction Association and Development and non-for-profit organizations in taking on a disability for a day.The group started at the Municipal Building, trying out doors and washrooms, before heading out on city streets, towards Olympic Plaza.“I have never noticed that! Whoop! Sorry! Curb!” remarked Farrell crossing the street on Stephan Avenue. She spent the first half of the tour blindfolded, with a cane, before moving around, albeit slowly, in a wheelchair.“It’s enlightening. I feel every little impediment… Every little obstacle, every little bump,” said Farrell.READ MORE: Edmonton cracks down on...

Toronto actors with disabilities kept out of auditions due to lack of accessibility – Toronto

Toronto actors with disabilities kept out of auditions due to lack of accessibility - Toronto
TORONTO — Actor Hal Myshrall has found himself on the outside of the film industry looking in. He literally can’t get inside Toronto casting houses for auditions due to a lack of accessibility.He said he was supposed to have an audition at Jigsaw Casting, but couldn’t get up the stairs.About five years ago he started having health problems, now, due to complications from diabetes, he can barely walk and gets around with the use of an electric scooter.He said he followed up with Jigsaw Casting asking why their studios are not accessible.“The person I had talked to turned around and said, ‘We are handicapped accessible, we have an elevator around the back of the building,'” said Myshrall.Global News went to the building. Down a muddy alley, there is a large yellow door, which presumably would reveal a freight elevator — nearly a...

Toronto woman drops human rights complaint over guide dog after apology

Toronto woman drops human rights complaint over guide dog after apology
TORONTO — A restaurant owner who was at the centre of Global News stories about accessibility has completely changed his perspective.The owner of Ikki Sushi hasn’t only apologized to the woman whose guide dog he told he did not want inside, but he is going above and beyond to make a difference.Bob Huang offered Karoline Bourdeau and her guide dog a warm welcome at his restaurant. He also issued an apology.READ MORE: Another Toronto business tells customer with guide dog they aren’t welcome“I’m so sorry,” was one of the first things Huang said when Bourdeau walked through the door for the first time since the incident occurred in the spring.Huang said what happened initially was a misunderstanding. Story continues below advertisement As Global News reported in March, he told Bourdeau and her husband that...

Voters frustrated, upset over accessibility issues at Dartmouth polling station – Halifax

Voters frustrated, upset over accessibility issues at Dartmouth polling station - Halifax
HALIFAX – Some voters in the federal election are disappointed and upset with a location of a polling station in Dartmouth, saying it is not friendly to those with accessibility issues.On Monday, voters cast ballots at a building behind St. Peter’s Church on Crichton Avenue. It sits on a hill and although there is a ramp at the back of the building, many voters were unaware and used the steps at the front of the building.Resident Roy Church said he was surprised the building was used in the first place.“It is a hill for the elderly to get around. Although you’re allowed to drive up, it’s not really marked that well,” he said.Voter Ross Osborne said he and his wife had to separate after casting their ballots. Story continues below advertisement “My wife has very bad knees. She said ‘I can’t walk back...

Advocate fights for more accessibility at federal election polling stations

Advocate fights for more accessibility at federal election polling stations
TORONTO — Matt Wozenilek almost lost the chance to vote four years ago.Not because he wasn’t eligible. But because he couldn’t get in the door.Wozenilek, who uses a wheelchair, went to a Guelph school to vote in the 2011 federal election but couldn’t get into the building: A heavy door blocked his way.A passerby held the door for him and Wozenilek finally voted. But he decided then and there that he “shouldn’t have to put up with that.”“I have rights just like everyone else and so I decided to lay a complaint against Elections Canada through the Canadian Human Rights Commission,” he said. “I felt that it was an issue that it should be accessible.” Story continues below advertisement He filed a human rights complaint that went to the  Human Rights Tribunal in Aug. 2014, which led to a...

Well-known Toronto business joins push for more accessibility after Global News story – Toronto

Well-known Toronto business joins push for more accessibility after Global News story - Toronto
TORONTO — A well-known Toronto retailer has followed through on his promise to make his store accessible. Now the owner of Tom’s Place, in Kensington Market, is calling on other businesses to do the same.At the start of the Parapan Am Games in August, Global News toured Kensington Market with the founder of the StopGap Foundation, Luke Anderson.StopGap has been doing what it can to make it easier to overcome physical barriers, building custom-made wooden ramps that can be deployed when needed, so people who cannot navigate stairs can still get inside.READ MORE: Parapan Am Games athletes and spectators may face barriers in Toronto: advocateIt was clear that several businesses were inaccessible due to a single step at the door.One of the businesses Anderson approached was clothing store Tom’s Place. Story continues below...

Broad Reach Foundation offers free sailing program for at-risk youth in Toronto – Toronto

Broad Reach Foundation offers free sailing program for at-risk youth in Toronto - Toronto
WATCH ABOVE: The Broad Reach Foundation for Youth Leaders is giving youth an opportunity to navigate their lives through a free sailing program in Toronto. Youth between the ages of 12 and 24 learn what it takes to be a team player on the water while developing confidence, leadership skills and responsibility. Susan Hay reports in this week’s Making a Difference.TORONTO – The Broad Reach Foundation for Youth Leaders works with youth agencies such as the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto to promote accessibility and inclusion for unprivileged youth who need it the most.“We’re really making the waterfront accessible to communities in Toronto that never have been able to come here,” said Danielle Lobo, a board director at the organization, which was founded in 1998.Through programs both on the shore and the water, youth aged 12 to 24...

Access an issue as new Vendôme-MUHC tunnel opens – Montreal

Access an issue as new Vendôme-MUHC tunnel opens - Montreal
WATCH: The tunnel linking the Vendome metro to the super hospital is open to public but as Global’s Tim Sargeant reports, there are some major issues when it comes to access.MONTREAL – “On time and on budget,” – that’s how government officials are selling the new pedestrian tunnel linking the Vendôme metro and train station with the new MUHC super hospital.The $5.16 million underground passage allows hospital employees, patients and visitors access to the MUHC without having to take a detour along de Maisonneuve boulevard.Limited accessThe time saving passage does come with constraints.The 34 metre tunnel brings people to the MUHC property, but not its front doors.READ MORE: New bus links Lionel-Groulx metro with MUHC hospitalPeople will have to walk outside for the remaining 200 metres. Story continues below...

Colorado theatre shooter’s psychiatrist was warned he thought about killing people – National

Colorado theatre shooter’s psychiatrist was warned he thought about killing people - National
WATCH: One of the most important witnesses took the witness stand in the Aurora theatre shooting trial. James Holmes was seeing a psychiatrist in the months leading up to the shooting. Rick Sallinger reports.CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — The psychiatrist who saw James Holmes repeatedly before he carried out his deadly attack on a Colorado movie theater said Tuesday that she had been warned before their first meeting that he said he was thinking of killing people.Dr. Lynn Fenton said the social worker who referred Holmes to her for therapy said he seemed extremely anxious, and had homicidal thoughts, which she then brought up in their first session.She has had other patients talk about killing people, she explained; the important thing is to figure out if they have a plan — “If they’re taking any steps to carry out any action that is related to...

Halifax Bike Week puts focus on city’s accessibility to cyclists – Halifax

Disability advocates question Toronto Parapan Am Games readiness - Toronto
WATCH: It’s bike week in Halifax, and that led us to wonder how bikeable the city is. Global’s Heide Pearson finds out.HALIFAX – Cycling is a common way for people to commute around Halifax, and it’s becoming more popular — but how rider-friendly are the city streets?Halifax Bike Week runs from June 4-15 and focuses on raising awareness that cycling is a common way to get around. It also aims to educate both cyclists and drivers about how to properly share the roads.“It’s huge for everyone, whether you cycle, you drive or you walk, to be aware of what the rules are, and also to be very cognizant and respectful of other people that are on the road,” said District 8 Coun. Jennifer Watts.Watts, along with District 7 Coun. Waye Mason, partnered with the Halifax Cycling Coalition to come up with ways to improve cycling in...